How to Make Your Workplace Safe and Inclusive for Trans and Nonbinary People

  1. Abandon binary language and thinking, including cissexist and heterosexist assumptions.
  2. Normalizing asking for and introducing yourself with your pronouns.
  3. Include gender pronouns on name badges, email signatures, and professional profiles.
  4. Protect private personnel information including deadnames.
  5. Respect gender transitions socially, medically, and legally.
  6. Fight for gender-neutral restroom equity.
  • Assuming someone’s gender identity.
  • Assuming the gender of their romantic partner.
  • Believing that there are only two sets of pronouns to identify individuals: he/him/his and she/her/hers. There are many sets of pronouns out there, and all of them are valid.
  • Assuming someone’s gender identity based on how masculine or feminine you judge their appearance to be.
  • Using gendered nicknames, titles, and terms to refer to peers.
  • Person A: “Hi, my name is Este Amane and my pronouns are they/them/theirs.”
  • Person B: “Nice to meet you! I’m T’Challa. My pronouns are he/him/his.”
  • Person A: “Hi, my name is Este Amane and my pronouns are they/them/theirs.”
  • Person B: “I’m Steve Rogers. It’s great to meet you.”
  • Person A: “Welcome to the team, Steve. What are your preferred pronouns?”
  • Be accountable for your mistakes, but also patient with yourself if you are struggling to adjust to someone’s name and/or pronouns change. It takes practice to adjust, and that’s okay. You don’t need to make a big deal out of it if you mess up, you just need to correct yourself, apologize if you think it’s appropriate, and move on.
  • Seek clarity on their boundaries when it comes to sharing their chosen name and pronouns, without asking invasive questions or breaching their privacy.
  • Don’t wait for a legal name change to update someone’s nameplate, email address, etc. to match their name. Trans and nonbinary people are who they say they are, regardless of whether this is reflected on any documents.

they/them. Black, queer, and nonbinary creative, policy wonk, and organizer. https://linktr.ee/esteamane

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Este Amane

Este Amane

they/them. Black, queer, and nonbinary creative, policy wonk, and organizer. https://linktr.ee/esteamane

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